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Five of 2014’s Best Part-Time IT Jobs with Benefits

Looking for a part-time IT job in an unlikely place? These companies may not necessarily be known for being IT-focused, but they do offer a multitude of benefits for part-time IT employees.

 Aerotek

The aerospace and defense recruiting and staffing firm offers part-time IT jobs positions in everything from engineering to construction. Contracted workers who put in 20 hours or more each week are offered a number of generous medical benefits, including dental and vision coverage. Spouses and any dependent children are eligible as well.

Reflection: My Marketing Internship at PROTECH

Finding a summer marketing internship in South Florida was not an easy task trying to work around my summer schedule before I went back up to Florida State University in the fall. When I stumbled upon PROTECH, I was grateful for the opportunity and experience to broaden my knowledge in a working environment. I wasn’t too familiar with marketing and what it entailed but I was willing to learn and grow, especially due to my major being in Communications.

5 IT Companies with the Greatest Employee Perks

IT companies offer their employees some of the greatest and most unique benefits you could even imagine. No more settling for your average parking spot or coffee machine, with these perks, you’ll wish you worked at these places in a minute.

Google

Not only does working at Google provide you with the vibrant and colorful work life you wish for everyday, they offer tons of employee benefits and perks that make getting up to go to work a little easier. The Googleplex is home to swimming pools, a gym, and even an on-site oil change and car wash service. If you’re having a hard day at the office (not likely), employees don’t hesitate to get a massage, take a nap in the nap pods, and stop by their café where all the food there is free.

IT Contract Jobs: Pro vs. Con

Pros

Temporary can be a great move. The advantage of working in a contract position is that it gives you the flexible opportunity to work somewhere new when in between jobs. If that full-time position doesn’t look like it’s making its way to your door anytime soon, a contract position might just be the right thing for you to hold you down while waiting for full-time to head your way. It can be the perfect replacement for the time spent waiting for another job to come. This added experience could just be the addition to your resume employers have been waiting for.

Salary will get you moving. Most contract positions pay their newfound employees a higher salary incentive. If your expertise are needed across the country, the salary might just be worth more than the hassle of moving. IT Contract jobs cost companies less than full-time employees. Since your benefits and vacation packages are most likely going to get lost on the way over, companies now have more money to spend on you and making your salary one you actually desire.

Why Opt For Careers in Information Technology?

Despite concerns about outsourcing leaving domestic workers without jobs, a career in information technology is still a great option for the computer science-minded and educated. The national average of an IT worker’s annual pay is about $102,316, and careers in information technology are set in a fast-growing industry with a high demand for workers in an increasingly digitalized world. There are several highlights that make a career in information technology appealing, attainable, and profitable.

The Ten Highest-Paid IT Jobs in the Industry

Information technology jobs are on the rise across the US; an IT specialist or someone just starting his education might find this list of high-growth and well-paying IT jobs to be of interest (Career titles and salaries from computerworld.com).

  1. CIO/CTO: $150,000-$230,000

What: Both executive-level positions, CIOs and CTOs deal with overseeing the technological developments and operations of a firm. The primary difference between these two IT jobs is that the Chief Technology Officer (CTO) mostly supervises the progress of new technologies, whereas the Chief Information Officer (CIO) solves issues through the use of existing innovations.

Nailing the Interview

You have an interview coming up, now what? The interview is often how employers choose between equally qualified candidates. How do you set yourself apart?

Confident but not Cocky

More and more companies are realizing the importance of team players. An employee may be perfectly capable of performing tasks but if they don’t work well on a team, it’s a no-go. If you come across as being cocky rather than confident, it could blow your chances at your dream job.

IT pros see lot of major cons to their chosen field

Ian Katz
January 31, 2005
Information technology is supposed to be fun, but don’t tell that to people working
in the sector.
In a survey of 150 tech professionals in South Florida, 62 percent said their
employment experience in the last four years has been negative. The words most
frequently used to describe that experience were frustrating, stressful,
disappointing, stagnant, unfulfilling, impersonal, overworked and
underappreciated.
In the survey, conducted by Protech, an IT job placement firm with offices in
Miami and Fort Lauderdale, 28 percent viewed their work as positive. Ten percent
said they felt neutral.
Ninety-one percent said they are willing to make a job change. After all, you can’t spell I QUIT without
IT.
To be sure, plenty of people in all fields hate their jobs. But the survey results reflect the tech sector’s
volatility.
The findings also support the long-held notion that tech professionals feel less loyalty to their employers
than other workers do. Considering that thousands of techies have been fired since the sector began to
slump in 2000-01, it is no wonder workers are quick to look for new opportunities.
The culture of stock options — the lure that attracted many techies in the late 1990s — also undermined
loyalty. A lot of people’s careers were shaped by the idea that they should grab riches while they were
available. When so many stock options ended up worthless, workers felt burned.
The Protech survey also asked which criteria professionals consider when evaluating job options.
Thirty-five percent cited a company’s culture, including career development and work/life balance; 32
percent said compensation; and 22 percent said the company’s strength. Eleven percent listed other
factors, including the commute and the job title.
When asked what a prospective employer could offer that would make them accept a job, the workers
said: a sound business plan, opportunity to grow and interesting work.
Because many techies have worked for companies that no longer exist, they are far more likely than
others to scrutinize a company’s business model before taking a job. It might sound odd if a candidate
for a newspaper reporting or auto mechanic position questioned the prospective employer about the
business model. Newspapers and car repair shops have been around as long as anyone can remember.
But there’s nothing strange about a candidate asking a software developer or Web design studio about
the nature of their business, since so many have sunk in recent years.
The South Florida Interactive Marketing Association will host a presentation called “Google:
Demystifying Search,” 6:30-8:30 p.m. Feb. 10 at the Riverside Hotel in Fort Lauderdale. Ron
Carpinella, a regional manager for Google, will be the speaker. For more information, www.sfima.com.
The South Florida Technology Alliance named Joel Ledlow, CEO of Boca Raton-based Acarra,
president. Other officers include: Deborah Vasquezof Protech, vice president; Elizabeth Bates of
Consultrex, secretary; Bill McGloin of KPMG, treasurer; Brian Nelson of Edwards & Angell, legal
counsel.
Tech stat of the week: Even as the Internet has become almost essential for gathering information on
health care, only 31 percent of Americans age 65 and over have ever gone online, according to a study
by the Washington-based Kaiser Family Foundation. However, 70 percent of the next generation of
seniors (ages 50-64) have been online.
Only 21 percent of those 65 and older have surfed the Internet to look for health information, compared
to 53 percent in the 50-64 age group.
Ian Katz can be heard talking about tech every Monday at 8:10 a.m. on WFTL (850-AM). He can be
reached at ikatz@sun-sentinel.com or 954-356-4664.
Copyright © 2005, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
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